Rule of Law and Security Sector Reform in International State-Building: Dilemmas of Converging Agendas

Cover: Hague Journal on the Rule of Law, 4 (1), Special Issue

Cover: Hague Journal on the Rule of Law, 4 (1), Special Issue

Ursula Schröder, Johannes Kode – 2012

In this article we discuss the integration of international security assistance and rule of law promotion within larger state-building projects. Going beyond the widespread claim that both approaches should be closely linked within overarching security sector reform (SSR) efforts, this article inquires more systematically into their relationship both at a conceptual level and at the level of state-building practices. It argues that the creation of effective security institutions cannot be easily reconciled with programmes that promote mechanisms of legitimate political control as one dimension of the rule of law. Rationales behind security and rule of law support diverge: the former aims to strengthen a state's enforcement capacities, while the latter seeks to restrict them. The case of security and rule of law support to the Palestinian National Authority in the West Bank illustrates the tensions that can result. The article shows that in the Palestinian case, selectivity, fragmentation and timing issues have impeded the coherence of international assistance.

Title
Rule of Law and Security Sector Reform in International State-Building: Dilemmas of Converging Agendas
Author
Ursula Schröder, Johannes Kode
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Location
Cambridge
Keywords
Research Project C6
Date
2012
Appeared in
Hague Journal on the Rule of Law, 4 (1), 31-53.
Language
eng
Type
Text